Net Neutrality

Should we support the Administration/FCC proposal to issue regulations regarding Net Neutrality?

No

One of the biggest mistakes we have permitted our government to do is to create the Federal Communications Commission. Established in 1934, it regulates interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. It is supposedly independent. But, as we know from the IRS, there is no such thing as an independent administration. Now the FCC is going to issue regulations concerning the Internet. Something called "Net Neutrality" that guarantees customer equal access to the net for the same price. That sounds good in theory. BUT, that means that service providers cannot optimize their profits by offering special programs to those who are wiling to pay. And worse, how long will it be before customers and providers have to pay a fine for politically incorrect posting.

Further:

As a libertarian you should know that it violates principles 3, 4, 8, and 7. See article on Libertarianism http://www.politico-cat.com/node/32 on this site.

As a free market supporter, you should reject any government proposal that uses "fairness" as an argument. One of the problems with Net Neutrality is that it purportedly guarantees equality of charges to users of the internet. This restricts the free market from setting the price and companies from offering special deals for higher bandwidth. Ultimately it will enable the FCC to issue licenses to internet provider or at least restrict them for offering special deal to customers that want special services.

As economist and one that pays the bills, See "Economics in One Lesson" Section 1, Chapter 17 http://fee.org/library/detail/economics-in-one-lesson-2. Remember the Paul Harvey rule, that the intended beneficiaries only receive 25% of the benefits for which we(they) are taxed.

Tell your Congressman to restrict the power of the FCC and stop their interference in one of the last free market industries.